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EpISODE 16 DIATONIC CHORDS

HOSTS- Jeremy Burns, Matthew Scott Phillips

 

TYPE- Theory

 

DURATION- 50:56

 

BUMPER MUSIC- "Our Mission Is Possible" (Area 47 Music)

ANNOUNCER- Mike Cunliffe

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DESCRIPTION

Many great chord progressions, in tonal music, are based on specific sequences of triads and chords that are naturally fulfilling or appealing. These chords often all consist of notes that strictly come from the major or minor scales they are based on. These chords are considered diatonic. When musicians start speaking about chords using numbers instead of letters, this is what they are talking about. Listen and learn more about the diatonic triads and 7th chords from the major and minor scales.

KEY WORDS DIATONIC- When a triad, chord or melody consists of notes solely from the given key, it is considered to be DIATONIC. CHROMATIC- When a triad, chord or melody consists of notes from outside of the given key, it is considered to be CHROMATIC or ALTERED. For example, an ALTERED CHORD may contain notes that are CHROMATIC. TONIC ( I )- A note in a melody or a chord in a progression based on scale degree 1 of the given key. SUPERTONIC ( ii )- A note in a melody or a chord in a progression based on scale degree 2 of the given key. MEDIANT ( iii )- A note in a melody or a chord in a progression based on scale degree 3 of the given key. SUBDOMINANT ( IV )- A note in a melody or a chord in a progression based on scale degree 4 of the given key. DOMINANT ( V )- A note in a melody or a chord in a progression based on scale degree 5 of the given key. SUBMEDIANT( vi )- A note in a melody or a chord in a progression based on scale degree 6 of the given key. SUBTONIC or LEADING TONE ( vii )- A note in a melody or a chord in a progression based on scale degree 7 of the given key. *It should be noted that all the above Roman numeral examples given were shown as uppercase (major) or lowercase (minor) as they relate to the MAJOR SCALE. We will soon discuss the DIATONIC chords from the MINOR SCALE. EXAMPLES

DIATONIC TRIADS IN MAJOR KEYS AND SCALES

The below example shows all triads based on the MAJOR scale. The uppercase Roman numerals signify major triads and the lowercase Roman numerals signify MINOR triads. Notice, above the staff, you will see the functions each of the DIATONIC chords (tonic, mediant, etc.).

The next example shows all triads based on the NATURAL MINOR scale. Notice that all the functions remain the same, for the most part. The VII chord no longer carries a LEADING TONE function. Instead, it is considered to be SUBTONIC.

The below example shows all diatonic 7th chords in MAJOR.

This fourth example shows all diatonic 7th chords in NATURAL MINOR.

THINGS TO REMEMBER -In both MAJOR and MINOR keys and scales, all chords and triads with PERFECT relationships (I, IV and V) share the same quality as the key they are in. -In both MAJOR and MINOR keys and scales, all chords and triads with MEDIANT relationships (iii and vi) share the opposite quality from the key they are in. -In the HARMONIC MINOR scale, the i chord becomes a MINOR MAJOR chord. The III chord becomes an AUGMENTED MAJOR 7th chord. The V chord becomes a DOMINANT 7th chord. Finally, the VII chord becomes a FULLY DIMINISHED (°) 7th chord. -In the MELODIC MINOR scale, the ii chord becomes a MINOR 7th chord. The IV chord becomes a DOMINANT 7th chord. The vi chord and the vii chords both become HALF DIMINISHED (ø) 7th chords.

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